All posts tagged: pistachio

Pistachio and Cherry Tiffin

I won’t insult your intelligence by suggesting that this is some great bake, or indeed, a new idea. I got the inspiration from a coffee chain’s pistachio and amaretti tiffin, but decided to recreate it with my own additions. As with all tiffin, it is very, very simple and a (excluding the amaretto soaked cherries) great thing to make with the kids. It would also make a lovely Christmas gift or addition to serve with coffee at the end of a meal. Ingredients: 100g Dried Cherries (chopped roughly) 40ml of Amaretto 225g Butter 45g Golden Syrup 50g Cocoa Powder 250g Amaretti 50g Pistachios, chopped 200g Milk Chocolate 100g Dark Chocolate Extra Pistachios, freeze Dried Cherries or sprinkles to decorate. Begin a day or two before you want to make the tiffin by soaking the dried cherries in the amaretto. The cherries will plump up and taste delicious. Line an 8′ square baking tray. Melt the butter and golden syrup in a saucepan over a gentle heat. Crush the amaretti biscuits fairly finely, then stir through …

Pistachio and Apricot Tart

  This recipe came about simply from chancing upon some very pretty apricots at the supermarket. I thought they would be delicious in a frangipane type tart, but then wondered what it would be like to substitute pistachios for the traditional almonds. There was only one way to find out; and I was delighted with the result. I have to say, though, that it’s maybe not the prettiest tart that I’ve ever made, and almost looks savoury. But I can assure you that it is sweet and delicious.   Ingredients: 300g of Sweet Pastry 100g of Butter, at room temperature 100g of Caster Sugar 2 Medium Eggs 150g of Pistachios 40g of Self Raising Flour 3 or 4 Apricots Preheat your oven to 180C. Roll out the pastry and line an 8″ tart tin with it, leaving the excess to hang over the edge. Prick the base with a fork several times and refrigerate for at least half an hour. Whilst the pastry is chilling prepare the apricots by cutting them in half and removing …

Dulce by Helen Vass

If you are a fan of the Glasgow food scene, then you may know Helen Vass. She is pastry chef at 2AA Rosette restaurant, Number 16, in the West End of the city. You may also know her from being part of the winning team of professional pastry chefs, along with Samantha Rain, winner of UK Junior Chocolate Master in 2014, and Mark Tilling, established chocolatier and UK Chocolate Master, teacher and pastry chef, who competed in Bake Off: Crème de la Crème earlier this year. Ever since her success in Bake Off, Helen has been in demand to share her desserts and expertise. And one of the routes that she has taken to reach this demand is to host dessert pop-up events in her home town of Glasgow. How she has manages to fit the preparation for such events into her schedule as a restaurant pastry chef is quite remarkable. I was fortunate to buy a ticket for her most recent pop-up, held in Studio 93 is Glasgow: a beautiful venue, tucked away beside …

Pistachio and Chocolate Cake

I have a confession to make. Well, not so  much a confession but a disclaimer. This recipe isn’t entirely original and mine. To be honest, I am fed up of seeing people posting their alleged “new recipes” when they have clearly been reworked from someone else’s and have not given them credit. So, I want to be clear, that this cake is a re-working and scaling of other people’s recipes, with a minor element being mine. The sponges that make up this cake are a scaling up of Annie Bell’s Chocolate and Pistachio cake in her Baking Bible.  I have long been a fan of hers since I picked up a very reduced copy of her Gorgeous Cakes in a discount book shop. To this day I have no idea why she isn’t a household name: the woman knows her stuff and her recipes are great. I opted to make my own filling of Pistachio Buttercream, mainly because I had some leftover. But I think it really works and adds to the pistachio flavour. The chocolate …

Well, hello there. It’s been a while.

I’ve not written a blog post in weeks and weeks. And it’s not because I haven’t been baking: in fact, I was very busy baking in May and June. Then we went on holiday (smashing, thanks for asking) and now we have a new puppy in the house. So, although I have a couple of bigger celebration cake blogs posts in me, I thought I would ease myself in with one of my favourite recipes. It’s based on a BBC Good Food biscuit recipe and I have adapted and played with it over the years. I thought I’d document and share my favourite version. I’ve said it countless times: these are such easy and quick biscuits. They are egg free and a great recipe to make with your kids, even toddlers. Pistachio & Chocolate Oaties (makes between 25 and 30) 250g of Butter, soft 150g of Light Brown Sugar 150g of Self Raising Flour 225g of Oats 80g of Pistachios, chopped 100g of Dark Chocolate chips (or a chopped up bar of chocolate) Cream the …

Rhubarb and Pistachio Meringue Roulade

I will keep this post brief but wanted to share with you the dessert that I made for my mum and my family for our Mother’s Day dinner this year. If you know me at all, you know what a huge rhubarb fan I am, and the forced rhubarb is is season now. Initially, I planned to bake a rhubarb cheesecake, but as time was running away with me yesterday I decided to make a meringue based dessert, and use some bits and pieces that I already had knocking about the kitchen. My mum isn’t such a big rhubarb fan but loves meringue and she loved the combination. And it *was* my Mother’s Day too! 😉 If you feel like playing with the flavours then be my guest. Don’t bother with the orange zest if you don’t have it, or try some lime; try an orange curd not lemon; change the nuts to slivers of almonds, or leave them out altogether; it’s pretty flexible and recipes like this are meant to be open to change …

Roses for Mother’s Day

This Sunday, in the UK, it is Mothering Sunday or Mother’s Day: a day to treat our mums, grannies and maternal folk to show them how much we appreciate them. Whilst listening to the radio this morning, I discovered that the origins of this day are to be found in the 16th century, when Christians were expected to return to their “mother churches” where they were baptised or to their local church or cathedral on the fourth Sunday in Lent. By Victorian times, when children as young as ten often left home to go into service, it became common practice to take the opportunity on this day to visit your mother, take her wild flowers and to spend time with your family. Modern day celebrations are often criticised for being too commercial (as are most modern Red Letter days in the West) but I can vouch that there is nothing more lovely than being presented with a hand drawn card and a tray of a comically assembled breakfast at 6am on Mother’s Day, eager faces …